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20 Questions with Author Adriana Gavazzoni

I admit this old man has a crush on Adriana  Gavazzoni, so the drool may become evident as you read along.

Best quote of the whole interview:

It was like a multiple orgasm, seriously! Best sensation, ever! -A. Gavazzoni

Adriana Gavazzoni

Gavazzoni is an attorney, a professor of Law and now an accomplished author who has written two well received and award winning novels: Behind the Door and Lara’s Journal.   In nonfiction, she has written a law book in her home country of Brazil.

 

20 Questions with Adriana Gavazzoni who won the Readers Choice Golden Book Award.  Her books are also available in Amazon’s Kindle Unlimited.

If you could go back in time and tell your younger writing self one thing, what would it be?

Be patient, my dear!

How did you spend the first bit of money you earned as a published author?

Buying publicity and advertisement to help spread the news about my novels! I’m still doing that, by the way.

How many unfinished or unpublished books do you have?

Unfinished? Just one…but it will be done soon, and I hope to publish it in January.

What is your writing process? Or, how many hours a day do you write?

It depends on the day… I try to write at least five days per week, and I set a goal of 1,500 words per day. I will stop only after reaching my goal.

What was your favorite childhood book(s)? Why?

When I was a little child, I loved to listen my mom reading Hansel and Gretel, which is called João e Maria in Portuguese. I always wanted to discover a house constructed of cake and confectionery!

When I could read by myself, I was crazy about Around the World in Eighty Days. I always loved to travel, and this book is a wonderful imaginary trip!

On average, how long does it take you to write a book? (First draft, rewrites, edits to finally publishing)

First draft, around six months, and at least another four to complete all edits and publish.

We all get bad reviews sometimes when we publish.  How do you deal with bad reviews?  

I cry! Kidding. ☺ I see them as an opportunity to improve my work when it’s a consistent review (something more than one person mentions). But I also think it’s possible some people just hate my writing style because they obviously like the genre, and it’s impossible to please everybody.

How would you describe your average reader?  Or, do you even have a particular kind of person in mind when you write?

I write for adults, my books are written for mature people who have been through or understand life’s tumultuous times and who have an open mind.

What are your hardest scenes to write?

I’m not fond of describing places. I love action scenes, so describing setting is the hardest part for me.

What is the best way you’ve found to market your books?

Well, I use pretty much everything—Twitter, Facebook, Instagram—and I enroll my novel in blogs, I do blog-tours, I participate in groups, and I believe the combination of all this is the best way to market my books. There is no magical, one way to do this—it’s a mix of different approaches.

What do you think are the challenges facing new writers?

To provide a quality product. To understand that it’s not enough to write a book; you have to give your reader a “clean” book—no mistakes, no grammar errors—presented with a professional layout and a high-quality cover… These are very important things for a new author to understand.

What are some things you’ve had to sacrifice in order to write and publish?

My free time, time with my family and friends, but I love to write, so I can’t say it’s a sacrifice. It’s a choice I made gladly.

How often do you read for pleasure? How many books a year do you read?  How fast do you read (words per minute)?

Every day, I read a little bit. I use to read around two books per month—one in English and one in French—to keep up with learning new vocabulary. I rarely read in my language, Portuguese, as I have to read a lot of technical, legal books.

Many indie authors live and die by KU (Kindle Unlimited) and the “normalized page read).  What are your views on KU, Amazon and where do you think KU will head in the future?

Digital reading is the future, I believe, and Kindle Unlimited is a good way to allow cheaper access to many books. I don’t know where KU is headed;  I’m not good at predicting those things, but I like the way it works. I also love paperback, because when a book is good, I can read it first (and quickly) in a digital format, but then I need to own a physical copy!

Many writers find editing drafts as frustrating.  How do you edit and what is your process?

I think it’s frustrating ☺ I work with a great editor, Jill Noble-Shearer, and she does the hard job of editing for me. I couldn’t do it without her skills from making certain the translation is accurate to checking grammar, punctuation, etc., in the final edition.

What software do you use to write?

Microsoft Word

Fans often have a preconceived notion of you.  What is one thing your fans would be surprised to learn if they really knew you or spent the whole day by your side?

That I’m not as glamorous as my pictures show. I’m a simple girl who loves to walk barefoot, play with dogs, who finds pleasure in feeding savage monkeys that live near my house, and who spends many, many hours alone, reading or writing… Ah…and also, I’m addicted to several television series.

What did it feel like to publish your first book?

It was like a multiple orgasm, seriously! Best sensation, ever!

What are some of the difficulties of writing characters of the opposite sex?

I’ve never thought about it because I love the male world. I have thousands of male friends, and I understand how men think, so I don’t find it difficult. I get inspired by men I know, men I like or despise, and I often translate their personalities into my characters in my books.

If they turned your life into a movie, who would you want to play you? Why?

Good question! I love Sharon Stone; I believe she is sexy, and she has brains. I would like someone like her—a mix of intelligence and sensuality—to represent me.

You can check out Gravazzoni at these locations:

Website: www.agavazzoni.com

Blog: www.agavazzoni.com/blog

Twitter: @a_gavazzoni

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/A-Gavazzoni-513404948849469/

Instagram: adri_gavazzoni

Amazon catalog

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Twenty Questions with Daniel Schinhofen

Daniel Schinhofen Books on Amazon
Daniel Schinhofen Books
Daniel Shcinhofen "Forming the Company" Alpha World Book 2
Daniel Shcinhofen “Forming the Company” Alpha World Book 2

I first began reading Daniel Schinhofen in March of 2017 about a month after Gamer for Life came out on Amazon.     And, then I read Forming the Company (Alpha World Book 2).

I was impressed.  Schinhofen writes well.  You get drawn into the characters quickly and they never let you go.  I’m not a book critic, and wouldn’t pretend to be one.  But, of all the #LitRPG’s, Schinhoten books stand out as some of the best.   I can only tell you what I like.  And, Alpha World is a great series.  

Check out the links at the bottom for Schinhofen’s works.

Twenty questions with Daniel Schinhofen.

If you could go back in time and tell your younger writing self any one thing, what would it be?

Follow my dreams earlier. I have been writing stuff on and off and never really finishing any of them. My grandmother, who passed last year, always encouraged us to follow our dreams. I didn’t really take the full plunge into writing until I found LITRPG.

How did you spend the first bit of money you earned as a published author?

Paid to get a cover for my first book. I had used the Amazon cover creator through KDP to begin with. Once I had money I paid a cover artist money to make me a cover for it. Which is the current cover still up on Last Horizon: Beta.

How many unfinished or unpublished books do you have?

There are a few that will never see the light of day, thank the gods for that. They are horrible and should never be seen. Books that I am currently working on two; Alpha World Book 3, Alpha Company & Apocalypse gates: Rapture. Both will hopefully be out by the end of this year.

What is your writing process? Or, how many hours a day do you write?

Most of my free time is spent writing. I don’t have a writing process though. I just sit down and write, and let the words flow. The writing takes up all the time I used to spend playing games and reading.

What was your favorite childhood book(s)? Why?

The Hobbit. No seriously, my mother read that to me at 6 years old. It was what made me start dreaming about writing a book.

On average, how long does it take you to write a book? (First draft, rewrites, edits to finally publishing).

From the start of a book to publishing? About 3 months, maybe 4, if I get a stall in the process anywhere. I am in awe of certain other authors who put a book out every month, those guys are just amazing.

We all get bad reviews sometimes when we publish.  How do you deal with bad reviews? 

Remind myself that people are dicks? Okay seriously, I still feel a small hit when I read them, if they have any merit. The ones that obviously didn’t take note of the blurb that said contains adult scenes I shrug those ones off. After that I go back to writing knowing that some people have enjoyed them, which is all I care about. Having 1 person enjoy the book as much as I enjoyed writing it was my goal with my very first book, and still is today.

How would you describe your average reader?  Or, do you even have a particular kind of person in mind when you write?

No idea, as the idea of an average person doesn’t exist to me. Everyone has their own quirks that make them them. I write for people like me. Those people who love games and love reading and want them combined. My old friends who I used to play MMO’s with, but who don’t any more due to life getting in the way. People like that are who I hope will enjoy my work.

What are your hardest scenes to write?

For me action scenes. Not my forte at all, even in books where a lot of action comes in I have a tendency to skim those scenes. Being told exactly how the MC twisted in mid-air before landing in a three-point stance to get the position needed to behead the mob he is fighting is hard for me. I like character moments more.

What is the best way you’ve found to market your books?

For me it has been word of mouth through Facebook. The multitude of pages dedicated to LITRPG has been my way. Which is good because I suck at selling myself. So props to those guys who have helped me get word out to fellow LITRPG fans.

What do you think are the challenges facing new writers?

New writers probably face the same challenges I did. Lack of experience, no editor, no money to spend on editing or a cover. I would also tell them if they think they are going to be successful to plan ahead. An LLC or similar is a good idea to help with the taxes incurred from writing.

What are some things you’ve had to sacrifice in order to write and publish?

I sacrificed my free-time, that was about it. I wrote my first work out of love, and it did okay. It did well enough for me to justify writing my second book. Which was not as good but that still gave me the courage to write my next series.

How often do you read for pleasure? How many books a year do you read?  How fast do you read (words per minute)?

I used to read 2 books a week easy. Since I started writing maybe 1 book a month. Writing really does eat up most of my time. As for my speed, no idea.

Many indie authors live and die by KU (Kindle Unlimited) and the “normalized page read).  What are your views on KU, Amazon and where do you think KU will head in the future?

Kindle unlimited has earned me the bulk of my money so far. Would I have been able to make up for it with book sales only? I don’t know but probably not to an equal extent. I would love to see KU overcome a lot of the scams and cheats that have been seen used there. I hope Amazon will devote more to it, but I doubt they will.

If it ever comes to be not as profitable I might drop KU and try to branch out to other services, but that is hopefully never going to happen. 

Many writers find editing drafts as frustrating.  How do you edit and what is your process?

Editing? Ugh why do you have to mention the ‘E’ word? I give it a going over once I’m done writing. I hand it to a good friend who is better at grammar then me and they go through it. I then go back through it again. After that, the beta readers get it, I have a lot more of them now woohoo. After I get their feedback I give it another go over then hope it is good enough and publish it.

I hope soon to get a paid editor to give it a once over as well. Hopefully in the not too distant future.

What software do you use to write?

Word.

Fans often have a preconceived notion of you.  What is one thing your fans would be surprised to learn if they really knew you or spent the whole day by your side?

Heh, hehe, hehehe, mwhahahaha. Oh wait your serious? They would probably run far and fast. Okay fine I’ll be serious; I am a geek or nerd to my core. Want to quote Monty Python, or the princess Bride, maybe the Fifth Element. I can do that and love to do it. Probably a bit too much, they would probably also be dragged into the D&D game I run on Sundays.

What did it feel like to publish your first book?

Fear, nervousness, anxiety. That is what I felt, along with a little rush of excitement. I only wanted 1 person to love the book as much as I did. Which happened, so in hindsight I should have felt more excitement.

What are some of the difficulties of writing characters of the opposite sex?

As a female friend of mine has told me, women think differently. They process information and emotions differently. When I need a cold look at something,  I hand it to her and then take her feedback.

If they turned your life into a movie, who would you want to play you? Why?

No thanks, pass. The only place that movie would be seen is in the adult sections anyway.

Okay I’ll think about it…. Ryan Reynolds, at least I know he can handle my humor.

Daniel Schinhofen on Amazon 

Goodreads Page

Patreon 

Twitter

Facebook Author Page

Facebook Group Page 

 

 

 

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Author Interview: Twenty Questions with Jamie Davis “Accidental Thief”

Jamie Davis author of Accidental Thief
Jamie Davis’ latest book is Accidental Thief – a LitRPG

Twenty Questions with Jamie Davis

Accidental Thief | $4.99 | 332 pages | Kindle Unlimited

 

Accidental Thief by Jamie Davis & Chris Davis
Accidental Thief by Jamie Davis & Chris Davis

Jamie Davis, RN, NRP, B.A., A.S., host of the Nursing Show (NursingShow.com) is a nationally recognized medical educator who began educating new emergency responders as a training officer for his local EMS program.  As a media producer, he has been recognized for the MedicCast Podcast (MedicCast.com), a weekly program for emergency medical providers like EMTs and paramedics, and the Nursing Show, a similar program for nurses and nursing students. His programs and resources have been downloaded over 6 million times by listeners and viewers.

Jamie lives in a home in the woods in Maryland with his wife, three children, and dog. He is an avid gamer, preferring historical and fantasy miniature gaming, as well as table top games. He writes urban and contemporary paranormal fantasy stories, among other things. His Future Race Game rules were written to satisfy a desire to play a version of the pod races from Star Wars episode 1.

20 Questions: 

If you could go back in time and tell your younger writing self one thing, what would it be?

I would tell my younger writing self to hold off on publishing that first book until I had more of the series written so I could build some reader loyalty over the first three books in the series. This is something I’ve done with my two newest series and the readers are responding in a very positive manner to getting the books faster with a new release every four or five weeks.

How did you spend the first bit of money you earned as a published author?

I think I took my wife out to dinner on my first royalty check from Amazon. We went to our favorite local place for some good home-style country fare.

How many unfinished or unpublished books do you have?

I always have a project in process but I don’t have any unpublished books in the wings like some authors do. This might be because I go ahead and publish everything I write eventually. I feel like there will always be someone who’ll enjoy a certain book or character story so why should I hold it back because of my doubts.

What is your writing process? Or, how many hours a day do you write?

I write about four hours a day, seven days a week. I get up early in the morning and write from four AM until eight or nine AM. Then I spend the afternoon working on marketing, responding to email, and connecting with readers and other writers. I also work in the afternoons on outlining the next story I’m planning to write. Then each chapter has a few sentences or a small paragraph describing what is supposed to happen. Once that’s ready, I have the info I need to flesh out the story from there into a full-sized novel.

What was your favorite childhood book(s)? Why?

That’s hard to say. I was a voracious reader as a child and read anything that was fantasy or sci-fi related. I guess if there was a single series it would be the Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis. I read and re-read that series at least ten times in between reading everything else I was picking up. The books connected with me. I identified with the characters and could see myself making similar decisions and mistakes. I use this a lot when I write today. I think it’s important to connect with your readers so they can identify with the things your characters do.

On average, how long does it take you to write a book? (First draft, rewrites, edits to finally publishing)

It usually takes me two to three months to write and publish a book from start to finish. I write the first draft in a month, edit for a few weeks, get the editor/proofreader to go over it and it’s ready to go!

We all get bad reviews sometimes when we publish.  How do you deal with bad reviews?  

I celebrate one-star reviews when I get them. They are either review trolls who like to go around and leave one-star reviews on everything they see or they’re opportunities to learn from an unsatisfied reader. I see the former as a badge of success. Only successful people have others trying to drag them backward back into the pack. The latter are opportunities to improve my writing craft and connect better on the next project with the readers.

How would you describe your average reader?  Or, do you even have a particular kind of person in mind when you write?

It depends on the genre I’m writing. For LitRPG books (which I co-write with my 23-year-old son, Chris), I picture a person very much like myself or my son. Male gamers who enjoy stories about gamers and the worlds in which they play.

For my Urban Fantasy books, I picture a female reader between the ages of 30 and 60. I know these are my target readers because I’ve surveyed the readers on my email list and I know their demographics.

I think it’s really important for authors or song writers or any artist to do this if you’re trying to make a living at this craft. If you just make art for yourself (which is fine), you can’t get upset if it doesn’t connect with others. I try to find the juxtaposition between what I like to write and what I think readers will enjoy, too. So far, I’ve guessed mostly right.

What are your hardest scenes to write?

For me, it has to be romantic scenes or interactions. I don’t write sex scenes but every good story has some sort of relationships in them. It doesn’t have to be overt but attraction is part of the human condition and a story without that angle at least somewhere seems empty to me. My wife is my primary beta reader and she tells me when I need a little more interaction and tension between the main character and their primary love interest.

What is the best way you’ve found to market your books?

Building an email list is the number one way I’ve found to consistently market my books to those who’ve identified themselves as my readers. It keeps me connected to them even when I don’t have a book coming out for a few weeks or months. Then when I have something new to send their way, they are ready and waiting for it.

What do you think are the challenges facing new writers?

The challenges faced by new writers are similar to those faced by more established writers, it just a matter of scale. For the new guy (or gal), you are struggling to find and identify with your readers. I remember when I had an email list of five people. I was related to all of them. You have to start somewhere and build on that base with consistent and persistent effort. Small changes, over time, build mountains. The same is true for authors. Try to do something to improve and build on your writing business every day.

What are some things you’ve had to sacrifice in order to write and publish?

I’ve given up a lot of TV time. I don’t watch a lot of narrative TV fiction. I’ll always have the news on in the background while I write. It’s my background buzz, but I don’t watch TV much for the shows that are put out (most of the time).

How often do you read for pleasure? How many books a year do you read?  How fast do you read (words per minute)?

I love to read for pleasure. I try to read a book a week. It keeps me connected to what’s popular out there and what is working for other authors I know. I’m a pretty fast reader so I buzz through books quickly.

Many indie authors live and die by KU (Kindle Unlimited) and the “normalized page read’.  What are your views on KU, Amazon and where do you think KU will head in the future?

Whether or not you are “all-in” for KU or not (or somewhere in between like me) is a straight up business decision. I like to keep from having all my eggs in one basket which is why most of my Urban Fantasy books are available in all the various online ebook stores. For LitRPG books, though, at least half of the readers in the genre are KU readers. This makes it a good business decision to put your book in the KDP Select world for at least the first few 90-day cycles until you’ve satisfied the readers on Amazon.

Authors need to examine what their long-term goals are and not just chase short term money. Amazon could change the terms of service in a heartbeat and drop the KU program. If and when that happens, there will be a lot of unhappy authors who didn’t have a good reason and a plan for their books.

Many writers find editing drafts frustrating.  How do you edit and what is your process?

I like to read aloud to myself or have my computer read the book aloud to me. My ears catch things my eyes never would. It’s a good trick to remember , especially for those who can’t afford expensive editing services when starting out in this business.

What software do you use to write?

I’m an avid Scrivener user for my writing. I use the StoryShop.io tool for planning my books and organizing my characters and settings. When it comes time to edit and compile the final draft into a book, I move to MS Word and Vellum to edit and publish respectively.

Fans often have a preconceived notion of you.  What is one thing your fans would be surprised to learn if they really knew you or spent the whole day by your side?

I think they’d be surprised by my other artistic pursuits, whether it is my music (I play electric bass in a church praise band), or how much I like to cook and prepare food. Each of them is an outlet for my complex creative drive.

What did it feel like to publish your first book?

I felt like I’d accomplished a lot and was simultaneously proud and nervous about the reader reactions.

What are some of the difficulties of writing characters of the opposite sex?

You have to put yourself in the head of the characters you’re writing. This includes members of the opposite sex. I think it’s really helped me that I’ve learned a lot by observing my two daughters growing up in our household. They’ve taught me how women react differently to the same situation than a man would. I don’t always get it right but that’s where my wife (my #1 fan and beta reader) comes in. She sets me straight when my female characters say something out of line with who they are.

And finally, if they turned your life into a movie, who would you want to play you? Why?

My life as a movie, wow! I think I would like John Cusak to play me in the movie of my life. I’ve always identified with him and his movies growing up and I think he’d be able to get inside my head and understand my motivations and drive in life.

My notes:  Jamie, thank you for taking the time to do the “20 Questions.”  You and Chris did an outstanding job on Accidental Thief.  A lot of respect goes out to you and all nurses, first responders, law enforcement and firefighters who put their safety at risk and often putting their own lives on the line, trying to help others.

You can check Jamie Davis out on his website: http://jamiedavisbooks.com

His latest book co-written by his talented son Chris Davis is on Amazon here.  Accidental Thief

I’ve included a universal like here.  It will take you to Amazon based on your countries IP address.   Accidental Thief 

Jamie Davis’ Amazon Author Page

Follow Jamie Davis on Twitter: @podmedic
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Facebook:  Follow and like Jamie here.

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20 Questions with Author Angel Ramon

We talk with Amazon Best Selling author Angel Ramon.  Ramon’s short story got up to #1 on Amazon’s list a few days ago.  Check out the links at the bottom for Ramon’s work.

Twenty questions with Angel Ramon.  Author of “Angel’s Nightmare Adventure” and “The Thousand Years War” (3 Book Series). 

If you could go back in time and tell your younger writing self-one thing, what would it be?

I would have told myself to finish The Thousand Years War series then instead of waiting until I was much older. Also I would had told myself that being in the in-crowd wasn’t all that and while I had fun, I also lost an opportunity to be published much earlier.

How did you spend the first bit of money you earned as a published author?

To be honest I spent the money on improving my covers and building my website for my author platform.

How many unfinished or unpublished books do you have?

Right now I have a work in progress, which will be a LitRPG novel. I have a bunch of ideas for future works, at least 10, lol.

What is your writing process? Or, how many hours a day do you write?

I like to listen to music while I’m writing. The music usually fits the tone of what I’m writing to get the creative juices flowing quicker. I tend to write for at least 6-8 hours a day when I’m not marketing or blogging.

What was your favorite childhood book(s)? Why?

During my childhood, I was a huge R.L. Stine fan and loved the Goosebumps series. The reason was, I was a horror fan and I loved the many twists and turns R.L. Stine wrote. This was part of my inspiration to become a writer and this was my source of horror entertainment before Resident Evil became famous.

On average, how long does it take you to write a book? (First draft, rewrites, edits to finally publishing)

Usually it takes me 4-6 months to get a book done, sometimes a little less time if I’m really into the story and if I’m not as busy trying to get new fans or sales. You know how that turns out, lol.

We all get bad reviews sometimes when we publish.  How do you deal with bad reviews?

That we do my friend. I look at them and see if there is any merit behind them. I found they have made me a better writer as I been able to spot more mistakes and improve my craft correctly rather than trying to be defensive and possibly cheating myself out of a learning experience.

How would you describe your average reader?  Or, do you even have a particular kind of person in mind when you write?

My kind of reader would be a geek like me who loves action and adrenaline pumped scenes. One that would be on the edge of their seat most of the time with only a few scenes to really let their guard down. Basically when you read my books, expect a twist at all times and not everything will have a definitive answer.

What are your hardest scenes to write?

The hardest scenes would be the emotional scenes as in my action-oriented books they are few and far between. So I try to make these scenes really stand out and have them explain the story or at least the character relationships better.

What is the best way you’ve found to market your books?

I notice the best ways have been through Facebook Groups such as the LitRPG Rebels and all the other LitRPG societies. Also for my horror books there are horror groups as well. YouTube podcast have also helped. However, what has helped me is that when I market or promote myself I put my personality and people can see that I’m really into what I write and that I believe in what I write.

What do you think are the challenges facing new writers? 

For me the biggest thing is obscurity and vanity publishers looking to try to make a quick buck from these unsuspecting new writers. Of course the biggest challenge for new writers is to gain readership for their books and making a name for themselves.

What are some things you’ve had to sacrifice in order to write and publish?

The biggest thing is time and lots of it. I’m not able to do as much with my family and pleasurable things as I’m trying to meet my self-made deadlines. I do suffer plently of sleepless nights especially while publishing and making my work ready for the public.

How often do you read for pleasure? How many books a year do you read? How fast do you read (words per minute)?

I try to read on the weekends as during the week I tend to be busy with my work(s) in progress. I’m a bit of a slow reader, unless the book is really good and catches my attention. I usually read 1-3 books a month on average.

Many indie authors live and die by KU (Kindle Unlimited) and the “normalized page read”.  What are your views on KU, Amazon and where do you think KU will head in the future?

This is a tough question because I do make a good amount on Kindle Unlimited. This month and last month have been great months for me on KU page reads. So I have to say that I do live on KU and it helps with my sales as many readers in my groups use KU to read books. What I will say is that the latest KU scam with clickfarms has ruined the KU system to a degree. I will say this; I will be using Kindle Unlimited for the long haul. However, I see more scammers begin to pop up and the global fund begins to decrease even further then I will possibly have to get out of Kindle Unlimited and maybe go wide. Amazon really needs to fix the “broken” KU system so that unethical authors will stop gaming the system or at least have a better idea who is doing so. For now the future of KU is uncertain in my view.

Many writers find editing drafts as frustrating.  How do you edit and what is your process?

I do 3-5 edits with the first one being plot holes, second being the second go around, then the third and following ones will be to spot typos, grammar issues, and sentence structure.

What software do you use to write?

For me I use good ole Microsoft Word to write my books.

Fans often have a preconceived notion of you.  What is one thing your fans would be surprised to learn if they really knew you or spent the whole day by your side?

They would be surprised to find out that there was a part of my life where I was all screwed up and where I was an actual alcoholic. I almost lost my girlfriend, friends, and my parent’s respect, heck even my job was in jeopardy. I almost screwed up my life until my girlfriend convinced me that I was acting like a total douchebag and she was tired of my bad attitude when I drank. Not to mention that my drinking wasn’t only on weekends, it would even take place during the week as well. She convinced me to start writing again as she liked poetry, from that point on I went back to writing.

What did it feel like to publish your first book?

It was the greatest feeling in the world. All my friends were happy for me, I finally achieved what I wanted back in junior high, and I found out that I could do it. From that point on I continued going.

What are some of the difficulties of writing characters of the opposite sex?

I actually don’t have much trouble writing about the opposite sex, as for me I believe that both genders are capable of doing anything.

If they turned your life into a movie, who would you want to play you? Why?

That would be a tough decision. However, I would say Tom Cruise because he is one of my favorite actors and he’s always played in some great movies such as Minority Report, Mission Impossible, and The War of the Worlds.

Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B01FNLAJL0

Facebook Pages:

The Thousand Years War: https://www.facebook.com/thousandyearswar/

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The Janus Series: https://www.facebook.com/janusseries/

The Hybrid Nation: https://www.facebook.com/hybridnationrevolution/

Twitter: @puertorico05971

Website: https://www.hybridnationrevolution.com/angel-ramon-medina

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