Category Archives: self publishing

My Daily Chatter – Jim Nesbitt Hardboiled Noir

Good day, fellow serial readers—

Jim Nesbitt – author of The Last Second Chance and The Right Wrong Number

I want to introduce you to indie author and publisher Jim Nesbitt.  He writes crime drama and has two books out.  Both are exceptional reads, underpriced and are on Kindle Unlimited.

I’m going to cut to the chase: go to Amazon and buy the damn books.  If you’re like me and have a Kindle Unlimited account, by all means, read them through that app.

Jim’s a cross between Jim Marrs and Rooster Cogburn.  His writing is rustic and raw—which makes him a pleasure to read.  I think you’ll agree.

Nesbitt’s first book, “The Last Second Chance,” introduced me to hardboiled noir even though it’s been around since the 1920s.  Gino Cox wrote a review that is 100% spot on:

The Last Second Chance is a thoroughly enjoyable tale of two men on a collision course, each blaming the other and seeking violent retribution and revenge. The author is a gifted storyteller with a flair for allusions and an eye for detail that combine to make relatively commonplace settings seem fascinating and unique. The characters are three-dimensional with intricate histories and believable motivations. Some characters are familiar, but with unique backgrounds. Others are unique characters one would not ordinarily encounter in a thousand lifetimes. But they all seem authentic. The story is character driven. Half a dozen characters are pursuing conflicting goals, each of which is fairly simple and straightforward in its own right. Taken together, the story is filled with unexpected twists and turns as the characters and plots intertwine and conflict.

It is not a difficult read; however, it is not a quick read. The prose is crafted with such skill that it needs to be savored. The allegories and allusions give the descriptions a unique texture.

Another reviewer said this about The Last Second Chance:

I checked the author’s bio twice while reading the novel finding it hard to believe he hasn’t published a dozen other award winners. The character development was rich and deep. The pace of the story kept me interested. And the plot made the book impossible to set aside.

Jim Nesbitt “The Last Second Chance” and “The Right Wrong Number”

Here is the link to Jim Nesbitt’s catalog.

Link to The Last Second Chance in paperback. 

I bought the paperback of The Last Second Chance.   It’s definitely a 5-star read.

Author Bio:

For more than 30 years, Jim Nesbitt roved the American Outback as a correspondent for newspapers and wire services in Alabama, Florida, Texas, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Washington, D.C. He chased hurricanes, earthquakes, plane wrecks, presidential candidates, wildfires, rodeo cowboys, ranchers, miners, loggers, farmers, migrant field hands, doctors, neo-Nazis and nuns with an eye for the telling detail and an ear for the voice of the people who give life to a story. He is a lapsed horseman, pilot, hunter and saloon sport with a keen appreciation for old guns, vintage trucks and tractors, good cigars, aged whiskey and a well-told story. He now lives in Athens, Alabama.

Top 25 Bestselling LitRPG Books Ending 09 Dec 2017

Rank Book Title Author Reviews Number of Pages
1 Super Sales on Super Heroes: Book 2 William D. Arand 123 382
2 Empire Burning (Emerilia Book 11) Michael Chatfield 24 302
3 Halcyon Rising: Breaking Ground Stone Thomas 24 233
4 Rapture (Apocalypse Gates Author’s Cut Book 1) Daniel Schinhofen 58 383
5 The Human Familiar (Familiar and the Mage Book 1) Honor Raconteur 104 277
6 The Twilight Obelisk (Mirror World Book #4) LitRPG series Alexey Osadchuk 14 435
7 Chronicles of a Royal Pet: Wood, Stone and Bone (Royal Ooze Chronicles Book 3) Ian Rodgers 5 326
8 Eden’s Gate: The Sands: A LitRPG Adventure Edward Brody 49 426
9 Viridian Gate Online: Imperial Legion: A litRPG Adventure (The Viridian Gate Archives Book 4) James Hunter 27 370
10 Dungeon Lord (The Wraith’s Haunt – A litRPG series Book 1) Hugo Huesca 119 332
11 The Way of the Clan 7 (World of Valdira) Dem Mikhaylov 3 275
12 The Starry Skies of Darkaan (Realm of Arkon Book 6) G. Akella 16 239
13 A Slave in the Locked Lands (LitRPG The Weirdest Noob Book 2) Arthur Stone 67 405
14 Project Alpha: Book 1 R.A. Mejia 19 366
15 Head Down (The Valens Legacy Book 4) Jan Stryvant 101 213
16 Skysworn (Cradle Book 4) Will Wight 243 257
17 For We Are Many (Bobiverse Book 2) Dennis E. Taylor 706 321
18 All These Worlds (Bobiverse Book 3) Dennis E. Taylor 672 282
19 Viridian Gate Online: Cataclysm: A litRPG Adventure (The Viridian Gate Archives Book 1) James Hunter 151 307
20 Dungeon Calamity (The Divine Dungeon Book 3) Dakota Krout 236 405
21 Black Hat (Afterlife Online Book 2) Domino Finn 35 365
22 The Gods of the Second World (LitRPG The Weirdest Noob Book 3) Arthur Stone 73 304
23 Viridian Gate Online: Crimson Alliance: A litRPG Adventure (The Viridian Gate Archives Book 2) James Hunter 158 358
24 Viridian Gate Online: The Jade Lord: A litRPG Adventure (The Viridian Gate Archives Book 3) James Hunter 102 376
25 First Login (Chronicle Book 1) Kevin Murphy 92 270

Jamie Davis’ Podcast “Understanding the LitRPG Genre and What Readers Want”

Jamie Davis is the author of more than a dozen novels including Accidental Thief.

Check out my 20 Questions with Jamie Davis. 

He’s also a registered nurse, a nationally recognized medical educator, and host of The Nursing Show.

How Jamie Became a Fiction Writer

Jamie got started as a novelist on a dare. He’s been a nurse and a medical educator for quite some time and has several nonfiction books available. In 2014, a friend of his dared him to write a novel for NaNoWriMo. He finished his novel during November and then it sat on the file for eight months.

Writing that first fiction novel stoked a creative fire in Jamie. He’s always considered himself a very creative person, and writing fiction gave him a different creative outlet than his nonfiction books or his podcast business.

He decided to release what would become the first book in his Extreme Medical Services series. It was very well received by listeners in Jamie’s podcast community, as well as fans of the urban fantasy genre.

The Extreme Medical Services series started as an idea for an educational web series that Jamie turned into a novel. Jamie is involved with seven podcasts and he writes for several blogs. He’s always writing. And ever since NaNoWriMo 2014, Jamie has always had a fiction project in process.

It never occurred to Jamie to go the traditional publishing route. He’s always been an entrepreneur. He was aware of self-publishing and the opportunities available to him to market to the audience of his choosing, rather than relying on an editor or publisher to decide where his book fit in the marketplace.

Check out the podcast here.

Check out outstanding author Matt Doyle

#SciFi, #Crime and #GameLit author Matt Doyle lives in South  East, England.  Rumor has it he has an extensive tea collection.   From his Amazon author page:

Matt Doyle lives in the South East of England and shares his home with a wide variety of people and animals, as well as a fine selection of teas. He has spent his life chasing dreams, a habit which has seen him gain success in a great number of fields. To date, this has included spending ten years as a professional wrestler, completing a range of cosplay projects, and publishing multiple works of fiction.

These days, Matt can be found working on far too many novels at once, blogging about anime, comics, and games, and plotting and planning what other things he’ll be doing to take up what little free time he has.

A  Sci-Fi murder mystery that has been described by reviewers as Sam Spade meets Blade Runner.

Check out Addict available on Amazon.

New Hopeland was built to be the centre of the technological age, but like everywhere else, it has its dark side. Assassins, drug dealers and crooked businessmen form a vital part of the city’s make-up, and sometimes, the police are in too deep themselves to be effective. But hey, there are always other options …

For P.I. Cassie Tam, business has been slow. So, when she’s hired to investigate the death of a local VR addict named Eddie Redwood, she thinks it’ll be easy money. All she has to do is prove to the deceased’s sister Lori that the local P.D. were right to call it an accidental overdose. The more she digs though, the more things don’t seem to sit right, and soon, Cassie finds herself knee deep in a murder investigation. But that’s just the start of her problems.

When the case forces Cassie to make contact with her drug dealing ex-girlfriend, Charlie Goldman, she’s left with a whole lot of long buried personal issues to deal with. Then there’s her client. Lori Redwood is a Tech Shifter, someone who uses a metal exoskeleton to roleplay as an animal. Cassie isn’t one to judge, but the Tech Shifting community has always left her a bit nervous. That wouldn’t be a problem if Lori wasn’t fast becoming the first person that she’s been genuinely attracted to since splitting with Charlie. Oh, and then there’s the small matter of the police wanting her to back off the case.

Matt’s other books include::

A sci-fi/GameLit series, ‘The Spark Form Chronicles’. The universal links for these are as follows (in order):
WICK: books2read.com/u/4ED7wz
CARNIVAL: books2read.com/u/bpW1e9
GIFTS: books2read.com/u/bwW9Z0
This series follows five professional card players as they take part in a future-based tournament where the battles are enacted for live audiences by holograms.

An ‘over the top’ performer guarding his companion’s right to life.
A genius programmer striving to retrieve her property.
An ex-mercenary sick of the abuse that she and her girlfriend receive.
A teenage girl desperately seeking to understand her past.
An old man intent on living on his own terms.

Five professional card players. Five reasons to fight. One thing in common: Their lives will be touched by the existence of the AI known as Carnival.

The Spark Form Chronicles combines card gaming with the excitement of professional wrestling, and tells a complex story that asks a simple question: Can an AI every truly be alive? Dive into Matt Doyle’s epic science fiction series to find out the answer.

You can also check Matt out on his website www.mattdoylemedia.com

Twitter: @mattdoylemedia
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MattDoyleMedia/

 

Are you a good fiction writer? Find out here (maybe?)

From: http://www.writersdigest.com/online-editor/writing-fiction-online-editor/three-step-preliminary-acid-test-whether-might-good-fiction-writer

By Joel Gordonson, Author of The Atwelle Confession

Anyone who has contemplated the time and effort needed to become a serious writer of fiction undoubtedly has wondered whether he or she has the right stuff to be good. After all, competition is stiff. A brief wander through bookstores or online leaves an aspiring author with an overwhelming sense of the daunting challenges ahead.

First, there’s the challenge of being good enough to obtain an agent, publisher and publicist—or justify the process of self-publishing. Then once you’re published, you are competing with the likes of Mark Twain, Dostoevsky, and Nobel laureates for literature. There are some 30 million books already in print. What are the odds of someone buying your book?

Can you become a successful writer of good fiction? It’s a prudent question to ask.

Here is a three-step acid test for a preliminary idea of whether you might have the right stuff. It’s not a complete or a sure-fire indicator of success. This acid test for some (Mark Twain, for instance) will show clearly the ability to tell fictional stories. And some writers might fail, yet still become world-class fiction writers. (Dostoevsky maybe? I’m guessing he would fail Step 1.) Nevertheless, these three steps might help you test and assess your potential.

20 Steps for Proofing Your Manuscript

From http://sandragerth.com/20-tips-for-proofreading-your-manuscript/

Whether you’re self-publishing or submitting your manuscript to a traditional publisher, proofreading your work is important. A carefully proofread book makes you look professional and shows readers and publishers that you care about the quality of your work.

Proofreading your own manuscript is not easy, though. After spending months or even years writing your book, you’re very familiar with the text. You see what you think you have written rather than what’s actually on the page.

Here are 20 proofreading tips that can make the process easier:

  1. Put your manuscript aside for at least a week after you finish writing. This allows you to get some distance from your work so you’ll see it with fresh eyes and can spot errors that you didn’t see before.
  2. Start with spell-check, but don’t rely on it. Spell-check can be a useful tool, but it won’t catch some mistakes (e.g., “to” instead of “too” or “who’s” instead of “whose”). It’ll also give you incorrect advice at times. You’ll still have to read through your manuscript.
  3. Change the layout of your manuscript. Changing how your document looks will enable you to see it in a new way so you can catch more mistakes. If possible, print out the entire manuscript and proofread the hard copy. Even if you don’t want to kill a tree, change the font type, size, and color (e.g., change 12-point Times New Roman in black to 14-point Tahoma in brown). Set the line spacing to double. Another option is to proofread the document on your e-reader.
  4. Change your environment. To put yourself in proofreading mode, you might also want to do your proofreading in a place different from where you write. Instead of your desk, try the kitchen table, the library, or a coffee shop.
  5. Read slowly. Proofreading shouldn’t be rushed. Take your time and focus on every word.
  6. Keep a dictionary and a style guide handy. Ask your publisher what dictionary and style guide they prefer. For example, Ylva Publishing uses Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition, and The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition, for manuscripts in American English.
  7. When in doubt, look it up. Is it halfhearted or half-hearted? Acknowledgment or acknowledgement? Noticeable or noticable? US or U.S.? U-Haul or U-haul? Take nothing for granted. If you’re not sure about the spelling of a word, look it up in the dictionary.
  8. Read the manuscript out loud. When you read the manuscript silently, your brain acts as an autocorrect tool that reads what should be there, not what’s actually on the page. Reading out loud slows you down and makes it easier to focus on what’s really written. It will help you discover missing words and make sure your dialogue sounds realistic.
  9. As an alternative to reading the entire manuscript out loud, which can be hard on the voice, have a text-to-speech app read it to you. I use an iOS app named Voice Dream that reads my text back to me while I read along on the screen.
  10. Use the search function. For every mistake you find, use your word processor’s find or find-and-replace feature to make sure you didn’t repeat the mistake anywhere else in the manuscript. You can also use the find-and-replace feature to replace double spaces with single spaces.
  11. Cover the rest of the text with a piece of paper or a ruler. That way, you’re looking at only one line at a time.
  12. Move your finger along to read one word at a time instead of allowing your gaze to race ahead.
  13. Read backward, from the end of the story to the beginning. Start with the bottom of the very last page. Some people read sentence by sentence, but if that doesn’t work for you, try it paragraph by paragraph. Reading backward stops you from getting lost in the flow of the story and allows you to focus on the individual words instead.
  14. Proofread first thing in the morning. Proofreading needs a lot of concentration, so it’s best to do it while your brain is fresh, not when you’re tired after a long day.
  15. Eliminate distractions. Turn off the TV, your cell phone, and maybe even the Internet so nothing will distract you while you proofread.
  16. Take breaks regularly. Since proofreading requires intense focus, you can’t do it for hours on end. Take a break at least once an hour, get up from your desk, and give your eyes and your brain a few minutes of rest.
  17. Do a second pass. Especially if you find a lot of mistakes in your manuscript, do a second proofreading pass. You could do separate passes for different proofreading issues.
  18. Create your individualized proofreading checklist. If you’re like most writers, you tend to make the same mistakes repeatedly. Make a list of your most common mistakes and add to that list whenever you discover a new mistake. Use the list to check each manuscript for those typical errors.
  19. Brush up on grammar rules. If you don’t know the basic rules of grammar and punctuation, proofreading is little more than guesswork, so take the time to learn the most important rules.
  20. Get someone else to proofread your manuscript. Having someone else proofread your manuscript doesn’t mean you get out of that task, but having a fresh pair of eyes in addition to your own is always a good thing. Try to find beta readers who are good with spelling and grammar, or trade with a fellow writer—proofread their manuscript in exchange for them proofreading yours.

So, how do you approach proofreading your manuscript? Do you have any other tips you want to share? Please leave a comment.

Creative Book Marketing and Promotion Ideas for Indie Authors and Self-published Books

For the last year we’ve been running a monthly round-up post called “Book Marketing Shots in the Dark“, in which we’ve shared some terrific advice from self-published authors around the world. Some of their success stories were arrived at almost by accident, following counter-intuitive ideas that had turned out better than anyone might have expected. But a growing number of them have resulted from intentional creativity, so from this month, I’m changing the title of the series to do better justice to the authors responsible.

The inventiveness of the indie sector is often a source of inspiration to the marketeers at trade publishers these days – go, indies!

Now on with this month’s collection of top tips – feel free to lift them for your own marketing plan.

Read more 

How to Get Holiday Book Sales

In the spirit of the 12 Days of Christmas, I’ve compiled a dozen tried-and-true tactics for holiday book sales. These are 12 of the most effective plans and strategies we’ve seen authors use to hit it big at the cash register.

Whatever your flavor of celebration, the rapidly approaching holiday season is a great time to sell your published eBook or printed book. After all, it’s a $3 billion business for booksellers at the end of the year, and according to Dominique Raccah, CEO of Sourcebooks, 25 percent of trade books are bought as gifts.

How do you get your share?

In the spirit of the 12 Days of Christmas, I have I have a dozen tried-and-true selling ideas for the holiday season. These are 12 of the most effective plans, strategies, and tactics we’ve seen BookBaby authors use to hit it big at the cash register.

Read more 

7 Book Marketing Lessons for the Self-Published Author

1. Plan Your Launch Around Your Goals

Whatever your goals for publishing a book, the way you promote it needs to fit around them. For example, if you want to make the New York Times bestseller list, you have to sell thousands of copies of your book from vendors who report their sales to the NYT, and you have to do it within a specific time. Your strategy could include offering a bonus to people who pre-order the book (since pre-orders count towards the first week of sales).

2. Build Relationships Before You Need Them

Start working on your book launch at least six months in advance, because that’s the minimum amount of time you need to build relationships.

Get under the radar of influencers by supporting them. If you have your own platform, like a podcast or blog, interview them and give them exposure. Sign up for their programs and be one of their success stories.

When the time comes, send influencers copies of your book, and ask for an endorsement and/or a review. If they like the book enough, they may even promote it to their audiences.

3. Engage Your Audience

Begin drumming up interest in your book by engaging your audience throughout its development. Hint that you’re up to something. Ask for their inputs on the cover design. Tease them with excerpts.

You’ll also want to keep building your audience through blog tours, interviews, and media exposure. Try signing up as a source on HARO.

Read more from Inc.