Category Archives: Media

Check out outstanding author Matt Doyle

#SciFi, #Crime and #GameLit author Matt Doyle lives in South  East, England.  Rumor has it he has an extensive tea collection.   From his Amazon author page:

Matt Doyle lives in the South East of England and shares his home with a wide variety of people and animals, as well as a fine selection of teas. He has spent his life chasing dreams, a habit which has seen him gain success in a great number of fields. To date, this has included spending ten years as a professional wrestler, completing a range of cosplay projects, and publishing multiple works of fiction.

These days, Matt can be found working on far too many novels at once, blogging about anime, comics, and games, and plotting and planning what other things he’ll be doing to take up what little free time he has.

A  Sci-Fi murder mystery that has been described by reviewers as Sam Spade meets Blade Runner.

Check out Addict available on Amazon.

New Hopeland was built to be the centre of the technological age, but like everywhere else, it has its dark side. Assassins, drug dealers and crooked businessmen form a vital part of the city’s make-up, and sometimes, the police are in too deep themselves to be effective. But hey, there are always other options …

For P.I. Cassie Tam, business has been slow. So, when she’s hired to investigate the death of a local VR addict named Eddie Redwood, she thinks it’ll be easy money. All she has to do is prove to the deceased’s sister Lori that the local P.D. were right to call it an accidental overdose. The more she digs though, the more things don’t seem to sit right, and soon, Cassie finds herself knee deep in a murder investigation. But that’s just the start of her problems.

When the case forces Cassie to make contact with her drug dealing ex-girlfriend, Charlie Goldman, she’s left with a whole lot of long buried personal issues to deal with. Then there’s her client. Lori Redwood is a Tech Shifter, someone who uses a metal exoskeleton to roleplay as an animal. Cassie isn’t one to judge, but the Tech Shifting community has always left her a bit nervous. That wouldn’t be a problem if Lori wasn’t fast becoming the first person that she’s been genuinely attracted to since splitting with Charlie. Oh, and then there’s the small matter of the police wanting her to back off the case.

Matt’s other books include::

A sci-fi/GameLit series, ‘The Spark Form Chronicles’. The universal links for these are as follows (in order):
WICK: books2read.com/u/4ED7wz
CARNIVAL: books2read.com/u/bpW1e9
GIFTS: books2read.com/u/bwW9Z0
This series follows five professional card players as they take part in a future-based tournament where the battles are enacted for live audiences by holograms.

An ‘over the top’ performer guarding his companion’s right to life.
A genius programmer striving to retrieve her property.
An ex-mercenary sick of the abuse that she and her girlfriend receive.
A teenage girl desperately seeking to understand her past.
An old man intent on living on his own terms.

Five professional card players. Five reasons to fight. One thing in common: Their lives will be touched by the existence of the AI known as Carnival.

The Spark Form Chronicles combines card gaming with the excitement of professional wrestling, and tells a complex story that asks a simple question: Can an AI every truly be alive? Dive into Matt Doyle’s epic science fiction series to find out the answer.

You can also check Matt out on his website www.mattdoylemedia.com

Twitter: @mattdoylemedia
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MattDoyleMedia/

 

20 Steps for Proofing Your Manuscript

From http://sandragerth.com/20-tips-for-proofreading-your-manuscript/

Whether you’re self-publishing or submitting your manuscript to a traditional publisher, proofreading your work is important. A carefully proofread book makes you look professional and shows readers and publishers that you care about the quality of your work.

Proofreading your own manuscript is not easy, though. After spending months or even years writing your book, you’re very familiar with the text. You see what you think you have written rather than what’s actually on the page.

Here are 20 proofreading tips that can make the process easier:

  1. Put your manuscript aside for at least a week after you finish writing. This allows you to get some distance from your work so you’ll see it with fresh eyes and can spot errors that you didn’t see before.
  2. Start with spell-check, but don’t rely on it. Spell-check can be a useful tool, but it won’t catch some mistakes (e.g., “to” instead of “too” or “who’s” instead of “whose”). It’ll also give you incorrect advice at times. You’ll still have to read through your manuscript.
  3. Change the layout of your manuscript. Changing how your document looks will enable you to see it in a new way so you can catch more mistakes. If possible, print out the entire manuscript and proofread the hard copy. Even if you don’t want to kill a tree, change the font type, size, and color (e.g., change 12-point Times New Roman in black to 14-point Tahoma in brown). Set the line spacing to double. Another option is to proofread the document on your e-reader.
  4. Change your environment. To put yourself in proofreading mode, you might also want to do your proofreading in a place different from where you write. Instead of your desk, try the kitchen table, the library, or a coffee shop.
  5. Read slowly. Proofreading shouldn’t be rushed. Take your time and focus on every word.
  6. Keep a dictionary and a style guide handy. Ask your publisher what dictionary and style guide they prefer. For example, Ylva Publishing uses Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition, and The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition, for manuscripts in American English.
  7. When in doubt, look it up. Is it halfhearted or half-hearted? Acknowledgment or acknowledgement? Noticeable or noticable? US or U.S.? U-Haul or U-haul? Take nothing for granted. If you’re not sure about the spelling of a word, look it up in the dictionary.
  8. Read the manuscript out loud. When you read the manuscript silently, your brain acts as an autocorrect tool that reads what should be there, not what’s actually on the page. Reading out loud slows you down and makes it easier to focus on what’s really written. It will help you discover missing words and make sure your dialogue sounds realistic.
  9. As an alternative to reading the entire manuscript out loud, which can be hard on the voice, have a text-to-speech app read it to you. I use an iOS app named Voice Dream that reads my text back to me while I read along on the screen.
  10. Use the search function. For every mistake you find, use your word processor’s find or find-and-replace feature to make sure you didn’t repeat the mistake anywhere else in the manuscript. You can also use the find-and-replace feature to replace double spaces with single spaces.
  11. Cover the rest of the text with a piece of paper or a ruler. That way, you’re looking at only one line at a time.
  12. Move your finger along to read one word at a time instead of allowing your gaze to race ahead.
  13. Read backward, from the end of the story to the beginning. Start with the bottom of the very last page. Some people read sentence by sentence, but if that doesn’t work for you, try it paragraph by paragraph. Reading backward stops you from getting lost in the flow of the story and allows you to focus on the individual words instead.
  14. Proofread first thing in the morning. Proofreading needs a lot of concentration, so it’s best to do it while your brain is fresh, not when you’re tired after a long day.
  15. Eliminate distractions. Turn off the TV, your cell phone, and maybe even the Internet so nothing will distract you while you proofread.
  16. Take breaks regularly. Since proofreading requires intense focus, you can’t do it for hours on end. Take a break at least once an hour, get up from your desk, and give your eyes and your brain a few minutes of rest.
  17. Do a second pass. Especially if you find a lot of mistakes in your manuscript, do a second proofreading pass. You could do separate passes for different proofreading issues.
  18. Create your individualized proofreading checklist. If you’re like most writers, you tend to make the same mistakes repeatedly. Make a list of your most common mistakes and add to that list whenever you discover a new mistake. Use the list to check each manuscript for those typical errors.
  19. Brush up on grammar rules. If you don’t know the basic rules of grammar and punctuation, proofreading is little more than guesswork, so take the time to learn the most important rules.
  20. Get someone else to proofread your manuscript. Having someone else proofread your manuscript doesn’t mean you get out of that task, but having a fresh pair of eyes in addition to your own is always a good thing. Try to find beta readers who are good with spelling and grammar, or trade with a fellow writer—proofread their manuscript in exchange for them proofreading yours.

So, how do you approach proofreading your manuscript? Do you have any other tips you want to share? Please leave a comment.

Another LitRPG Podcast – Reviews

I’m behind on my reading list.  I try to pick up as many of  Ramon’s recommendations as I can.  He does a great job (much better than I ever could) of reviewing #LitRPG books as they come out.

I’ve said he’s the hardest working man in LitRPG, and I mean it.  I can’t keep up.

Check out his latest edition.

New Releases and Reviews: Gong and Chalice: Epic LitRPG Adventure (Fayroll – Book 4) http://amzn.to/2woIviS Escape from Hell: A LITRPG Adventure (Kingdom of Heaven Book 2 http://amzn.to/2xNjzAK Dembo’s Ditty (A LitRPG Gamebook) http://amzn.to/2wJt877 Blood Reign: LitRPG Series Book 1 http://amzn.to/2wof7ZN Battle for Mesrath: A LitRPG Adventure: Grottos and Vixens, Alpha Elf Book 1 http://amzn.to/2vsqZwD Extraction Protocol: A LitRPG Space Marine Adventure (Omicron Sector Book 1) http://amzn.to/2xe2FPU Total Immersion: Dark World: A LitRPG Adventure http://amzn.to/2xMRdqB Venia Online: A LitRPG Saga http://amzn.to/2xy8FQm Infinite Reality: Daggerland Online Novel 1 A LitRPG Adventure http://amzn.to/2wJ0Rgd

Terry Pratchett’s unfinished novels destroyed by steamroller | Books | The Guardian

The unfinished books of Sir Terry Pratchett have been destroyed by a steamroller, following the late fantasy novelist’s wishes. Pratchett’s hard drive was crushed by a vintage John Fowler & Co steamroller named Lord Jericho at the Great Dorset Steam Fair, ahead of the opening of a new exhibition about the author’s life and work. Pratchett, famous for his colourful and satirical Discworld series, died in March 2015.

Source: Terry Pratchett’s unfinished novels destroyed by steamroller | Books | The Guardian

Author Interview: Twenty Questions with Jamie Davis “Accidental Thief”

Jamie Davis author of Accidental Thief
Jamie Davis’ latest book is Accidental Thief – a LitRPG

Twenty Questions with Jamie Davis

Accidental Thief | $4.99 | 332 pages | Kindle Unlimited

 

Accidental Thief by Jamie Davis & Chris Davis
Accidental Thief by Jamie Davis & Chris Davis

Jamie Davis, RN, NRP, B.A., A.S., host of the Nursing Show (NursingShow.com) is a nationally recognized medical educator who began educating new emergency responders as a training officer for his local EMS program.  As a media producer, he has been recognized for the MedicCast Podcast (MedicCast.com), a weekly program for emergency medical providers like EMTs and paramedics, and the Nursing Show, a similar program for nurses and nursing students. His programs and resources have been downloaded over 6 million times by listeners and viewers.

Jamie lives in a home in the woods in Maryland with his wife, three children, and dog. He is an avid gamer, preferring historical and fantasy miniature gaming, as well as table top games. He writes urban and contemporary paranormal fantasy stories, among other things. His Future Race Game rules were written to satisfy a desire to play a version of the pod races from Star Wars episode 1.

20 Questions: 

If you could go back in time and tell your younger writing self one thing, what would it be?

I would tell my younger writing self to hold off on publishing that first book until I had more of the series written so I could build some reader loyalty over the first three books in the series. This is something I’ve done with my two newest series and the readers are responding in a very positive manner to getting the books faster with a new release every four or five weeks.

How did you spend the first bit of money you earned as a published author?

I think I took my wife out to dinner on my first royalty check from Amazon. We went to our favorite local place for some good home-style country fare.

How many unfinished or unpublished books do you have?

I always have a project in process but I don’t have any unpublished books in the wings like some authors do. This might be because I go ahead and publish everything I write eventually. I feel like there will always be someone who’ll enjoy a certain book or character story so why should I hold it back because of my doubts.

What is your writing process? Or, how many hours a day do you write?

I write about four hours a day, seven days a week. I get up early in the morning and write from four AM until eight or nine AM. Then I spend the afternoon working on marketing, responding to email, and connecting with readers and other writers. I also work in the afternoons on outlining the next story I’m planning to write. Then each chapter has a few sentences or a small paragraph describing what is supposed to happen. Once that’s ready, I have the info I need to flesh out the story from there into a full-sized novel.

What was your favorite childhood book(s)? Why?

That’s hard to say. I was a voracious reader as a child and read anything that was fantasy or sci-fi related. I guess if there was a single series it would be the Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis. I read and re-read that series at least ten times in between reading everything else I was picking up. The books connected with me. I identified with the characters and could see myself making similar decisions and mistakes. I use this a lot when I write today. I think it’s important to connect with your readers so they can identify with the things your characters do.

On average, how long does it take you to write a book? (First draft, rewrites, edits to finally publishing)

It usually takes me two to three months to write and publish a book from start to finish. I write the first draft in a month, edit for a few weeks, get the editor/proofreader to go over it and it’s ready to go!

We all get bad reviews sometimes when we publish.  How do you deal with bad reviews?  

I celebrate one-star reviews when I get them. They are either review trolls who like to go around and leave one-star reviews on everything they see or they’re opportunities to learn from an unsatisfied reader. I see the former as a badge of success. Only successful people have others trying to drag them backward back into the pack. The latter are opportunities to improve my writing craft and connect better on the next project with the readers.

How would you describe your average reader?  Or, do you even have a particular kind of person in mind when you write?

It depends on the genre I’m writing. For LitRPG books (which I co-write with my 23-year-old son, Chris), I picture a person very much like myself or my son. Male gamers who enjoy stories about gamers and the worlds in which they play.

For my Urban Fantasy books, I picture a female reader between the ages of 30 and 60. I know these are my target readers because I’ve surveyed the readers on my email list and I know their demographics.

I think it’s really important for authors or song writers or any artist to do this if you’re trying to make a living at this craft. If you just make art for yourself (which is fine), you can’t get upset if it doesn’t connect with others. I try to find the juxtaposition between what I like to write and what I think readers will enjoy, too. So far, I’ve guessed mostly right.

What are your hardest scenes to write?

For me, it has to be romantic scenes or interactions. I don’t write sex scenes but every good story has some sort of relationships in them. It doesn’t have to be overt but attraction is part of the human condition and a story without that angle at least somewhere seems empty to me. My wife is my primary beta reader and she tells me when I need a little more interaction and tension between the main character and their primary love interest.

What is the best way you’ve found to market your books?

Building an email list is the number one way I’ve found to consistently market my books to those who’ve identified themselves as my readers. It keeps me connected to them even when I don’t have a book coming out for a few weeks or months. Then when I have something new to send their way, they are ready and waiting for it.

What do you think are the challenges facing new writers?

The challenges faced by new writers are similar to those faced by more established writers, it just a matter of scale. For the new guy (or gal), you are struggling to find and identify with your readers. I remember when I had an email list of five people. I was related to all of them. You have to start somewhere and build on that base with consistent and persistent effort. Small changes, over time, build mountains. The same is true for authors. Try to do something to improve and build on your writing business every day.

What are some things you’ve had to sacrifice in order to write and publish?

I’ve given up a lot of TV time. I don’t watch a lot of narrative TV fiction. I’ll always have the news on in the background while I write. It’s my background buzz, but I don’t watch TV much for the shows that are put out (most of the time).

How often do you read for pleasure? How many books a year do you read?  How fast do you read (words per minute)?

I love to read for pleasure. I try to read a book a week. It keeps me connected to what’s popular out there and what is working for other authors I know. I’m a pretty fast reader so I buzz through books quickly.

Many indie authors live and die by KU (Kindle Unlimited) and the “normalized page read’.  What are your views on KU, Amazon and where do you think KU will head in the future?

Whether or not you are “all-in” for KU or not (or somewhere in between like me) is a straight up business decision. I like to keep from having all my eggs in one basket which is why most of my Urban Fantasy books are available in all the various online ebook stores. For LitRPG books, though, at least half of the readers in the genre are KU readers. This makes it a good business decision to put your book in the KDP Select world for at least the first few 90-day cycles until you’ve satisfied the readers on Amazon.

Authors need to examine what their long-term goals are and not just chase short term money. Amazon could change the terms of service in a heartbeat and drop the KU program. If and when that happens, there will be a lot of unhappy authors who didn’t have a good reason and a plan for their books.

Many writers find editing drafts frustrating.  How do you edit and what is your process?

I like to read aloud to myself or have my computer read the book aloud to me. My ears catch things my eyes never would. It’s a good trick to remember , especially for those who can’t afford expensive editing services when starting out in this business.

What software do you use to write?

I’m an avid Scrivener user for my writing. I use the StoryShop.io tool for planning my books and organizing my characters and settings. When it comes time to edit and compile the final draft into a book, I move to MS Word and Vellum to edit and publish respectively.

Fans often have a preconceived notion of you.  What is one thing your fans would be surprised to learn if they really knew you or spent the whole day by your side?

I think they’d be surprised by my other artistic pursuits, whether it is my music (I play electric bass in a church praise band), or how much I like to cook and prepare food. Each of them is an outlet for my complex creative drive.

What did it feel like to publish your first book?

I felt like I’d accomplished a lot and was simultaneously proud and nervous about the reader reactions.

What are some of the difficulties of writing characters of the opposite sex?

You have to put yourself in the head of the characters you’re writing. This includes members of the opposite sex. I think it’s really helped me that I’ve learned a lot by observing my two daughters growing up in our household. They’ve taught me how women react differently to the same situation than a man would. I don’t always get it right but that’s where my wife (my #1 fan and beta reader) comes in. She sets me straight when my female characters say something out of line with who they are.

And finally, if they turned your life into a movie, who would you want to play you? Why?

My life as a movie, wow! I think I would like John Cusak to play me in the movie of my life. I’ve always identified with him and his movies growing up and I think he’d be able to get inside my head and understand my motivations and drive in life.

My notes:  Jamie, thank you for taking the time to do the “20 Questions.”  You and Chris did an outstanding job on Accidental Thief.  A lot of respect goes out to you and all nurses, first responders, law enforcement and firefighters who put their safety at risk and often putting their own lives on the line, trying to help others.

You can check Jamie Davis out on his website: http://jamiedavisbooks.com

His latest book co-written by his talented son Chris Davis is on Amazon here.  Accidental Thief

I’ve included a universal like here.  It will take you to Amazon based on your countries IP address.   Accidental Thief 

Jamie Davis’ Amazon Author Page

Follow Jamie Davis on Twitter: @podmedic
Go directly to Twitter

Facebook:  Follow and like Jamie here.

New LitRPG Reviews from Ramon Mejia

The hardest  working guy in #LitRPG, Ramon Mejia reviews

Shaman’s Revenge (The Way of the Shaman Book 6) (09:20)
http://amzn.to/2iaxUVe

Earth’s Gambit (The Gam3 Book 2) (16:16)
http://amzn.to/2x60Tft

Fistin’ the Furious (Caverns and Creatures) (21:07)
http://amzn.to/2wp1iwJ

Epsilon Shadow Gate: A Litrpg Novel (22:38)
http://amzn.to/2w308XA

The Kingdom Stone: A LitRPG Series (Royaume Cycle Book 1) (25:47)
http://amzn.to/2i7GQuA

Unlikely Heroes: A LitRPG Science-Fiction Adventure (31:26)
http://amzn.to/2vKqr2k

Accidental Thief: A LitRPG Accidental Traveler Adventure (37:52)
http://amzn.to/2woKqWRRamon Mejia #LitRPG Podcast

Ramon’s links:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/litrpgpodcast/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/LitRPGPodcast
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3-e…
Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/geekbytespodcast

Famed Author Adriana Gavazzoni on The Naked Talk w/ Alex Okoroji

Famed author and law professor #AdrianaGavazzoni

Here’s the who, what, when where
Adrina Gavazzoni

Who: Famed author, Adriana Gavazzoni
Winner of the Golden Book Award, 2017Reader’s Choice Winner

Adriana is a law professor as well as being an accomplished author.   She won the Reader’s Choice Golden Book Award in 2017.  She also was an honorable mention at the Paris Book Festival.   Her books: Behind the Door and Lara’s Journal have been well received internationally.

What: Interview on The Naked Talk with Alex Okoroji

When: Monday, 28 AUG 2017

Time Zones:

American
5 pm (Eastern USA)
4 pm (Central USA)
3 pm (Mountain USA)
2 pm (Western USA)

International:
6 pm (Brazil)
10 pm (London, UK)
7 am (Sydney, AU)
5 pm (Toronto, CA)
11 pm (Paris, FR)

Where: The Naked Talk
You can also call in: 323.642.1693

 

Indie Authors – Common Denominators & Why So Many Fail | The Supernatural World of Nicola C. Matthews

Nicola Matthews on why many indie authors fail.

No one is willing to put aside their competitive nature to see the larger picture of what they could accomplish if they just worked together.

Source: Indie Authors – Common Denominators & Why So Many Fail | The Supernatural World of Nicola C. Matthews